Microplastics worse for crabs and other marine life than previously thought: Enter through gills

Our poor friends with gills…

High-res asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

asapscience:

A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo Contest

Let’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 

via Sploid

(via feeling-fishy)

Aki Inomata, Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?

2010-2013
video (9min.41sec. / NTSC 16:9)
photo(lanbda print with acrylic / φ250mm / each of 6) Aki Inomata, Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?

2010-2013
video (9min.41sec. / NTSC 16:9)
photo(lanbda print with acrylic / φ250mm / each of 6) Aki Inomata, Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?

2010-2013
video (9min.41sec. / NTSC 16:9)
photo(lanbda print with acrylic / φ250mm / each of 6) Aki Inomata, Why Not Hand Over a

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

griseus:

The spotted handfish (Brachionichthys hirsutus), an amazing creature that walks the ocean floor, is a rare Australian fish from the family Brachionichthyidae. It is classified as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List 2002. is the first Australian marine species to be threatened with extinction.

The greatest threats to the handfish appear to be siltation and invasive species. The Derwent Estuary where the fish lives is highly urbanised and industrialised, and a range of marine pests have been introduced through shipping.  One key pest is the Northern Pacific Seastar (Asterias amurensis), a particularly large and voracious predator that is now abundant in the estuary. Studies by CSIRO show that the seastars eat the stalked ascidians that the handfish use to attach their eggs.

(via eduardo-)

Fisheries Law Enforcement Team formed in Daanbantayan

savephilippineseas:

(Daanbantayan, Cebu—July 25, 2014) In line with the Municipality of Daanbantayan’s pursuit to eliminate illegal fishing activities, the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) Region-7 and NGO Save Philippine Seas conducted a rigorous three-day training on Coastal Law Enforcement in the…

So proud of my friends Anna and Dennis for refusing to give up on the two years (ish) it took to organise this ground-breaking multi-stakeholder workshop! By all accounts it was extremely successful, and goes to prove that local communities do care about their natural resources, and sometimes all they need is a little push in the right direction. 

I’m looking forward to seeing that changes that come after this workshop, in an island that has stolen all our hearts, Malapascua.