Happy World Ocean’s Day! 

Brilliant news from Brunei, which announced a nation-wide ban on shark catches and landing, the first country-wide commitment to shark protection in the Asia! 

"The Sultan of Brunei, makes a landmark declaration today, on World Oceans Day: "That the government (through the Department of Fisheries), will enforce the ban on the catch and landings of all shark species from the waters of Brunei Darussalam and thus their sales in the domestic market. Furthermore, the government will also now officially enforce the ban on the importation and trade of shark products which has been in placed since August 2012. These measures are, probably the world’s first commitment by any country."

I hope that the huge amount of positive attention Brunei is getting will encourage other countries to follow suit! 

Read more from WildAid

Video from John Benedict Lu - Regional Director Shark Savers (Asia-Pacific)

scienceethicspolitics

There’s perhaps no other animal on Earth so synonymous with all things diminutive as the modestly framed shrimp — but, as it turns out, not everything about those famed crustaceans is small. Biologists say that common shrimp farming methods across Asia are so devastating to fragile ecosystems as to make ordering a simple shrimp cocktail one of the worst things you could do for the environment in the name of grabbing some grub.

Not to mention the actual footprint on the seafloor from shrimp trawlers. So not only are Mangroves cleared for shrimp farming, but the reefs too. With a double-edged sword cutting into coastal ecosystems, our appetite for Shrimp will soon leave us wanting. 

rhamphotheca
rhamphotheca:

Great Hornbill (Buceros bicornis) 
… also known as Great Indian Hornbill or Great Pied Hornbill, is one of the larger members of the hornbill family (95–120 cm (38–47 in) long, with a 152 cm (60 in) wingspan and a weight of 2.15–4 kg (4.7-8.8 lbs)).Great Hornbills are found in the forests of Nepal, India, the Malay Peninsula and Sumatra, Indonesia. Their impressive size and colour have made them important in many tribal cultures and rituals. The Great Hornbill is long-lived, living for nearly 50 years in captivity. They are predominantly frugivorous although they are opportunists and will prey on small mammals, reptiles and birds…
(read more: Wikipedia)   (picture: Kalyanvarma)

 The first time I came across one of these, I didn’t see it. I heard it through the canopy of a patch of rainforest in Langkawi, Malaysia. Not it’s call mind, but the air displaced by it’s wings.
Wikipedia says “The sound produced has been likened to the puffing of a steam locomotive starting up.”
The thought that pierced through the cloud of excitement as we strained fruitlessly to see through the canopy was “That is what pterodactyls must sound like”.
We saw it later atop a tree. It was humongous.

rhamphotheca:

Great Hornbill (Buceros bicornis)

… also known as Great Indian Hornbill or Great Pied Hornbill, is one of the larger members of the hornbill family (95–120 cm (38–47 in) long, with a 152 cm (60 in) wingspan and a weight of 2.15–4 kg (4.7-8.8 lbs)).Great Hornbills are found in the forests of NepalIndia, the Malay Peninsula and SumatraIndonesia. Their impressive size and colour have made them important in many tribal cultures and rituals. The Great Hornbill is long-lived, living for nearly 50 years in captivity. They are predominantly frugivorous although they are opportunists and will prey on small mammals, reptiles and birds…

(read more: Wikipedia)   (picture: Kalyanvarma)

 The first time I came across one of these, I didn’t see it. I heard it through the canopy of a patch of rainforest in Langkawi, Malaysia. Not it’s call mind, but the air displaced by it’s wings.

Wikipedia says “The sound produced has been likened to the puffing of a steam locomotive starting up.”

The thought that pierced through the cloud of excitement as we strained fruitlessly to see through the canopy was “That is what pterodactyls must sound like”.

We saw it later atop a tree. It was humongous.