jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Monday Mind Massage: “This Is Our Planet”

Need help getting in the groove to start the week? Here’s another heart-palpitating time lapse video of our beautiful home, as seen from the International Space Station. 

The aurorae, the ionic lightshow of “atmospheric airglow”, loads of lightning, and a few of the 16 sunrises and sunsets they see every day on the ISS.

Soundtrack: The XX

Author: Tomislav Safundžić

Sense of uncontrollable awe: The universe

( Rebecca J. Rosen, The Atlantic)

Breathtaking. Much needed Monday inspiration :)

earthandscience

ruineshumaines:

Better Than A Van Gogh: NASA Visualizes All The World’s Ocean Currents. Our oceans are every bit as turbulent as “Starry Night.

We imagine the ocean as having high tides and low tides, water that comes in and out in waves. Beyond that, how does water actually move around the world? What’s that flow look like?

What you’re looking at is the surface current flow (not anything deeper) of oceans around the world, recorded from 2006 to 2007. The white lines are the currents, and the darker blue colors of the water represent bathymetry (the fancy word for misnomer “ocean topography”).

NASA Scientific Visualization Studio assembled this remarkable animation of the surface currents of our oceans. It’s called Perpetual Ocean, and the full work is 20 minutes of HD video, assembled from a huge amount of satellite, on location, and computational data generated by ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase 2). ECCO2 itself exists to better understand our oceans and their role in the changing global climate.

Watch the video HERE.

ponderinthought
ponderinthought:

Breakfast of Champions?
As part of his series on albatros chicks taken in the isolated Pacific Ocean Islands of Midway, Chris Jordan shows us that on a diet of human trash, tens of thousands of these chicks die on Midway every year from starvation, toxicity and choking.
When one finds bottle caps, plastic bags, toothbrushes and syringes in the stomachs of baby birds on one of the most remote islands on Earth, does it not begin to raise serious questions about the harm we (the human species) are doing to this Earth?

A lot of the debris that Albatross’ feed their chicks comes from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. I think more worrying than finding this much rubbish on remote islands (and that is worrying) is the fact that there is plastic trapped in the middle of the ocean. So much of it. The density of plastic bits in the patch outnumbers zooplankton SEVEN TIMES. 

ponderinthought:

Breakfast of Champions?

As part of his series on albatros chicks taken in the isolated Pacific Ocean Islands of Midway, Chris Jordan shows us that on a diet of human trash, tens of thousands of these chicks die on Midway every year from starvation, toxicity and choking.

When one finds bottle caps, plastic bags, toothbrushes and syringes in the stomachs of baby birds on one of the most remote islands on Earth, does it not begin to raise serious questions about the harm we (the human species) are doing to this Earth?

A lot of the debris that Albatross’ feed their chicks comes from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. I think more worrying than finding this much rubbish on remote islands (and that is worrying) is the fact that there is plastic trapped in the middle of the ocean. So much of it. The density of plastic bits in the patch outnumbers zooplankton SEVEN TIMES. 

fyearth
fyearth:

crownedrose: I’d just like to point out that I can’t find the same exact image above anywhere on NASA’s site, which means it’s a possibility that this was photoshopped to put the two Earth photos together for a comparison. Though there’s some problems I’d like to point out as I find it important:
The 2012 Earth was photographed in January, so let’s just keep in mind that we are in the season where the environment is in a bit of a dormant stage. The images were collected by VIIRS on the recently launched Suomi NPP satellite. From NASA’s site: “It is the first of a new generation of satellites that will observe many facets of our changing Earth.”
Maybe I’m forgetting something, but the only photos of Earth taken in the 1970’s were during the Apollo missions, photographing Africa and Antarctica; not the Earth photo on the left showing North America. The next photo - I believe -  to be complied of Earth was in 1997, 25 years after Apollo’s iconic “Blue Marble”.
The photo of North America/Earth on the left was taken back in 2001, and this photo looks to be more saturated compared to the same photo on NASA’s official website. That photo was collected between June and September; months with more vegetation. The 2001 version (or left one marked “1978” above) here was collected mostly by MODIS. We also must remember that we’ve advanced in taking these types of photos as well.
I felt this was of importance to point out the correct dates of when these were taken so that there is no confusion.

 What they said.


*hangs head* I jumped on the knee-jerk reblog band wagon without thinking it through. All of the above makes sense.
I do think it’s important to be accurate when reporting things like this, but the fact that this may be an exaggeration should not be an excuse for us to say “it’s ok then”.
Europe has already destroyed it’s forests, and rainforests are being continually cut down for their hidden treasures. 
So it’s not as bad as in the picture (it’s just winter). But that doesn’t mean you can relax until the comparison IS accurate. 
The Forest Stewardship Council certifies sustainably sourced wood and their cute little logo is on loads of products. Choose them. For example all of the Body Shops combs etc are FSC certified. 

fyearth:

crownedrose: I’d just like to point out that I can’t find the same exact image above anywhere on NASA’s site, which means it’s a possibility that this was photoshopped to put the two Earth photos together for a comparison. Though there’s some problems I’d like to point out as I find it important:

The 2012 Earth was photographed in January, so let’s just keep in mind that we are in the season where the environment is in a bit of a dormant stage. The images were collected by VIIRS on the recently launched Suomi NPP satellite. From NASA’s site: “It is the first of a new generation of satellites that will observe many facets of our changing Earth.”

Maybe I’m forgetting something, but the only photos of Earth taken in the 1970’s were during the Apollo missions, photographing Africa and Antarctica; not the Earth photo on the left showing North America. The next photo - I believe -  to be complied of Earth was in 1997, 25 years after Apollo’s iconic “Blue Marble”.

The photo of North America/Earth on the left was taken back in 2001, and this photo looks to be more saturated compared to the same photo on NASA’s official website. That photo was collected between June and September; months with more vegetation. The 2001 version (or left one marked “1978” above) here was collected mostly by MODIS. We also must remember that we’ve advanced in taking these types of photos as well.

I felt this was of importance to point out the correct dates of when these were taken so that there is no confusion.

 What they said.

*hangs head* I jumped on the knee-jerk reblog band wagon without thinking it through. All of the above makes sense.

I do think it’s important to be accurate when reporting things like this, but the fact that this may be an exaggeration should not be an excuse for us to say “it’s ok then”.

Europe has already destroyed it’s forests, and rainforests are being continually cut down for their hidden treasures. 

So it’s not as bad as in the picture (it’s just winter). But that doesn’t mean you can relax until the comparison IS accurate. 

The Forest Stewardship Council certifies sustainably sourced wood and their cute little logo is on loads of products. Choose them. For example all of the Body Shops combs etc are FSC certified. 

discoverynews
discoverynews:

Madasgascar Says Hands Off 
Madagascar is one of the poorest countries on Earth yet has proposed to  create more than 1 million hectares (3,861 square miles) of protected  areas to provide for the long-term conservation of its marine resources, including coral reefs and mangroves.
Areas of particularly high biodiversity value on  islands, reefs and bays are in jeopardy.
keep reading

discoverynews:

Madasgascar Says Hands Off

Madagascar is one of the poorest countries on Earth yet has proposed to create more than 1 million hectares (3,861 square miles) of protected areas to provide for the long-term conservation of its marine resources, including coral reefs and mangroves.

Areas of particularly high biodiversity value on islands, reefs and bays are in jeopardy.

keep reading