Showing 10 posts tagged NASA

High-res jtotheizzoe:

ATTENTION folks, there is currently an astronaut posting to Tumblr from space. I repeat, there is a human being, that is currently in freakin’ SPACE, posting pictures (from said SPACE) to their Tumblr blog.
There are things, called words, that are failing me, about the other things, that I am feeling.
Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield: You sir, are cooler than a polar bear’s toenails.
(He’s also on Twitter)

jtotheizzoe:

ATTENTION folks, there is currently an astronaut posting to Tumblr from space. I repeat, there is a human being, that is currently in freakin’ SPACE, posting pictures (from said SPACE) to their Tumblr blog.

There are things, called words, that are failing me, about the other things, that I am feeling.

Expedition 35 Commander Chris Hadfield: You sir, are cooler than a polar bear’s toenails.

(He’s also on Twitter)

High-res Typhoon Pablo from the Johnson Space Center
Holy shit. 
Pablo is a big boy. He slowed down for a while, but he’s back up to Super Typhoon (Cat 5) status. He hits the south of Philippines in the morning. The whole country is braced. Strongest typhoon in 22 years. Currently 260 km/hr.
Here’s hoping for the best for those in his path. Stay safe and dry Mindanao, Visayas, Palawan. 

Typhoon Pablo from the Johnson Space Center

Holy shit. 

Pablo is a big boy. He slowed down for a while, but he’s back up to Super Typhoon (Cat 5) status. He hits the south of Philippines in the morning. The whole country is braced. Strongest typhoon in 22 years. Currently 260 km/hr.

Here’s hoping for the best for those in his path. Stay safe and dry Mindanao, Visayas, Palawan. 

High-res discoverynews:

Interstellar Travel is Hard, Why Bother?

To our ancestors, intercontinental travel would have seemed as insurmountable as interstellar travel does now (interplanetary travel is currently a feat we only dare send robots!). 
But in the case of intercontinental travel, mankind did succeed, driven by a basic need to explore.

let’s go…

Look at this image. Just look at it. I can’t stop looking! It’s one of the most stunning images I have ever seen.
Interesting read as well, I remain optimistic on the subject. 

discoverynews:

Interstellar Travel is Hard, Why Bother?

To our ancestors, intercontinental travel would have seemed as insurmountable as interstellar travel does now (interplanetary travel is currently a feat we only dare send robots!).

But in the case of intercontinental travel, mankind did succeed, driven by a basic need to explore.

let’s go…

Look at this image. Just look at it. I can’t stop looking! It’s one of the most stunning images I have ever seen.

Interesting read as well, I remain optimistic on the subject. 

Nasa scientist: climate change is a moral issue on a par with slavery

Averting the worst consequences of human-induced climate change is a “great moral issue” on a par with slavery, according to the leading Nasa climate scientist Prof Jim Hansen.

He argues that storing up expensive and destructive consequences for society in future is an “injustice of one generation to others”.

Hansen, who will next Tuesday be awarded the prestigious Edinburgh Medal for his contribution to science, will also in his acceptance speech call for a worldwide tax on all carbon emissions.

Hansen will argue in his lecture that current generations have an over-riding moral duty to their children and grandchildren to take immediate action. Describing this as an issue of inter-generational justice on a par with ending slavery, Hansen said: “Our parents didn’t know that they were causing a problem for future generations but we can only pretend we don’t know because the science is now crystal clear.

"We understand the carbon cycle: the CO2 we put in the air will stay in surface reservoirs and won’t go back into the solid earth for millennia. What the Earth’s history tells us is that there’s a limit on how much we can put in the air without guaranteeing disastrous consequences for future generations. We cannot pretend that we did not know."

Read more: The Guardian

  • Guardian

ruineshumaines:

Better Than A Van Gogh: NASA Visualizes All The World’s Ocean Currents. Our oceans are every bit as turbulent as “Starry Night.

We imagine the ocean as having high tides and low tides, water that comes in and out in waves. Beyond that, how does water actually move around the world? What’s that flow look like?

What you’re looking at is the surface current flow (not anything deeper) of oceans around the world, recorded from 2006 to 2007. The white lines are the currents, and the darker blue colors of the water represent bathymetry (the fancy word for misnomer “ocean topography”).

NASA Scientific Visualization Studio assembled this remarkable animation of the surface currents of our oceans. It’s called Perpetual Ocean, and the full work is 20 minutes of HD video, assembled from a huge amount of satellite, on location, and computational data generated by ECCO2 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase 2). ECCO2 itself exists to better understand our oceans and their role in the changing global climate.

Watch the video HERE.

(via earthandscience)

The Right Stuff
The Mercury 7 had it, and Ed Harris had it when he played John Glenn in the film “The Right Stuff" based on Tom Wolfe’s book. 
It’s about the jump from Test Pilots who were breaking Mach 1 and 2 to the selection process and missions of Project Mercury. 
It is an epic film, a real testament to the time of the Space Race and to the story of those brave and awesome men and their families. 

The Right Stuff

The Mercury 7 had it, and Ed Harris had it when he played John Glenn in the film “The Right Stuff" based on Tom Wolfe’s book. 

It’s about the jump from Test Pilots who were breaking Mach 1 and 2 to the selection process and missions of Project Mercury. 

It is an epic film, a real testament to the time of the Space Race and to the story of those brave and awesome men and their families. 

Space Squid

When the space ship Endeavour launched last week, it was carrying an unusual cargo: a baby bob-tail squid.

This is not because the astronauts want a change in their menu: the squid could help us understand how “good” bacteria behave in the microgravity of space. As Jamie Foster of the University of Florida in Gainesville, who is running the experiment, puts it: “Do good bacteria go bad?”

We already know that disease microbes grow faster and become more virulent if they are sent into space. In 2006 Salmonella bacteria were sent up on a space shuttle, and when they returned to Earth they were almost three times as likely to kill mice as normal (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0707155104). Escherichia coli also changes its behaviour. These studies all focused on harmful bacteria. “This is the first to look at beneficial bacteria,” Foster says.

Foster has arranged to send up the bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes, a Pacific species that carries a cargo of bacteria called Vibrio fischeri in its body. The microbes colonise young squid soon after the squid hatch and set up home in their light organs. The squid use the bacteria to generate light, which they shine downwards to ensure they don’t cast a visible shadow.

Foster’s experiment is simple. Newly hatched squid that have not yet encountered their bacterial partners will go up to orbit in tubes of seawater. Fourteen hours after launch, an astronaut will add the bacteria and give them 28 hours to colonise the squid. Then the squid will be killed and fixed solid, and brought back to Earth for examination.

Foster has some preliminary results from Earth-bound experiments that simulated microgravity and appeared to show problems with the uptake of bacteria by squid. If the shuttle study shows the same result, it would suggest that astronauts’ relationships with their own microbes might also be affected in space. “We want to make sure the astronauts are healthy,” she says.

Foster developed the experiment with Margaret McFall-Ngai of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Florida Space Grant Consortium and students from Milton Academy in Massachusetts and Merritt Island High School, Florida.