Palm oil facts:

* 90 per cent of Sumatra’s orangutan population has disappeared since 1900. They now face extinction

* 90 per cent of wildlife disappears when the forest is replaced by palm, creating a biological desert

* 98 per cent of Indonesia’s forests may be destroyed by 2022 according to the United Nations

* 43 of Britain’s 100 top grocery brands contain or are thought to contain palm oil

The Independent. Warning, article will infuriate. (via climateadaptation)

climateadaptation:

Looks like about 200 orangutans were killed. I’ll post more in the am.
sexyactionplanet:

Sumatran Orangutan: “It is no longer several years away, but just a few months or even weeks before this iconic creature disappears”Hundreds of orangutans are believed to have died in fires deliberately lit by palm oil companies in the last few weeks. Conservationists say the rare Sumatran orangutan could now be wiped out within weeks.

Read more here.

climateadaptation:

Looks like about 200 orangutans were killed. I’ll post more in the am.

sexyactionplanet:

Sumatran Orangutan: “It is no longer several years away, but just a few months or even weeks before this iconic creature disappears”
Hundreds of orangutans are believed to have died in fires deliberately lit by palm oil companies in the last few weeks. Conservationists say the rare Sumatran orangutan could now be wiped out within weeks.

Read more here.

High-res 
 
While palm oil biofuel production is a major source of income for Malaysia, clear-cutting the rain forest for the palm plantations also has dramatic ecological and social costs. Palm oil biofuel production growth is fuelling the rapid clearing of the most biodiverse tropical forest in the world, endangering species that need this habitat. In addition, forests contain large quantities of carbon which are released when they are burnt to make space for farming. Photographer Daniel Kukla started photographing the palm plantations in Borneo in October 2010:

“For me, the word ‘Borneo’ conjured up vivid dreams of lush impenetrable rain forests teeming with life. Upon my arrival to the island of Borneo I was confronted by the reality of this place where huge tracts of old growth rain forest have been cleared for oil palm plantations. After many long drives through the countryside seeing only palm plantations, I wanted to see the landscape might look like from a different vantage point. I took a small propeller plane around the southern part of Sabah to get this aerial shot. Despite the strange beauty to the verdant parallel lines and snaking dirt roads, I felt a sinking feeling while I was photographing. So much has already been lost and the plantations continue to eat away into the landscape.”


 Exactly how I felt when I went. Couldn’t believe the expanse of it.

While palm oil biofuel production is a major source of income for Malaysia, clear-cutting the rain forest for the palm plantations also has dramatic ecological and social costs. Palm oil biofuel production growth is fuelling the rapid clearing of the most biodiverse tropical forest in the world, endangering species that need this habitat. In addition, forests contain large quantities of carbon which are released when they are burnt to make space for farming. Photographer Daniel Kukla started photographing the palm plantations in Borneo in October 2010:

“For me, the word ‘Borneo’ conjured up vivid dreams of lush impenetrable rain forests teeming with life. Upon my arrival to the island of Borneo I was confronted by the reality of this place where huge tracts of old growth rain forest have been cleared for oil palm plantations. After many long drives through the countryside seeing only palm plantations, I wanted to see the landscape might look like from a different vantage point. I took a small propeller plane around the southern part of Sabah to get this aerial shot. Despite the strange beauty to the verdant parallel lines and snaking dirt roads, I felt a sinking feeling while I was photographing. So much has already been lost and the plantations continue to eat away into the landscape.”

 Exactly how I felt when I went. Couldn’t believe the expanse of it.

(via carolinafrica)

take-nothing-but-photos:

Malaysia to spend $7.7M to defend palm oil from criticism
The Malaysian government will spend 24 million ringgit ($7.7 million) in 2011 and 2012 to counter criticism over the social and environmental impact of palm oil, reportsANTARA.Deputy Minister for Plantation Industries and Commodities Datuk Hamzah Zainuddin said Malaysia would “promote the advantages” of palm oil relative to other alternatives. He added that conversion of rainforests for oil palm plantations “is not damaging the environment,” citing Malaysia’s current forest cover as proof.“In Malaysia, the total land area covered by forests is 56.4 per cent,” he said.Malaysia is the world’s second largest producer of palm oil after Indonesia. It has roughly 4.5 million hectares of oil palm plantations.Malaysia aims to increase production over the next decade by improving productivity across existing plantations and targeting roughly a million hectares of indigenous forest land in Sarawak, a state in Malaysian Borneo. Environmentalists and human rights activists complain that planned expansion will run roughshod over traditional communities while destroying large areas of rainforest.Past and current efforts by Malaysia to defend palm oil against criticism have met mixed reviews. In 2009 Britain’s Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), a group that regulates advertisements, banned a “misleading” ad by the palm oil industry. Bloggers and journalists have also complained about a deluge of comment spam whenever they post an article critical of palm oil.The oil palm is the world’s most productive commercial oil seed. Palm oil is used widely as a cooking oil and in processed food products, cosmetics, and cleaning agents. Europe is considering importing palm oil biodiesel to help meet renewable fuels targets, although recent scientific research indicates that greenhouse gas emissions savings from switching to palm oil from conventional fossil fuels are non-existent when forests and peatlands are cleared to produce palm oil.MAKES ME SO ANGRY! NOT DAMAGING TO THE ENVIRONMENT????? AARRRGGGHH

 How a monoculture can be more advantageous over the biologically productive ecosystem is beyond me. A ploy for instant monetary gratification - no doubt it supports many thousands of plantation workers - but the price paid in the long term comes out of everyone’s, not just Malaysian’s pockets.
To call it anything else is adding insult to injury. “Not damaging” as evidenced by Malaysia’s "56.4 per cent forest cover"? Conveniently legislation was passed to name monoculture as "forest". It’s so transparent I can’t believe they are even trying. 
I’m heartbroken by this news. Malaysia is where I fell in love with Rainforests.  And I love the country, the food, the people, the language. But I grew up watching rubber plantations turn to palm oil, and then spread and spread until there are literally just pockets of Rainforest left on the Peninsula, let alone the unchecked pillage of Sabah’s forests. Now they’re going after Sarawak?
Malaysia should be proud of it’s natural reserves, not in it’s ability to decimate them.
MALAYSIA TRULY ASIA? What. ever.

take-nothing-but-photos:

Malaysia to spend $7.7M to defend palm oil from criticism

The Malaysian government will spend 24 million ringgit ($7.7 million) in 2011 and 2012 to counter criticism over the social and environmental impact of palm oil, reportsANTARA.

Deputy Minister for Plantation Industries and Commodities Datuk Hamzah Zainuddin said Malaysia would “promote the advantages” of palm oil relative to other alternatives. He added that conversion of rainforests for oil palm plantations “is not damaging the environment,” citing Malaysia’s current forest cover as proof.

“In Malaysia, the total land area covered by forests is 56.4 per cent,” he said.

Malaysia is the world’s second largest producer of palm oil after Indonesia. It has roughly 4.5 million hectares of oil palm plantations.

Malaysia aims to increase production over the next decade by improving productivity across existing plantations and targeting roughly a million hectares of indigenous forest land in Sarawak, a state in Malaysian Borneo. Environmentalists and human rights activists complain that planned expansion will run roughshod over traditional communities while destroying large areas of rainforest.

Past and current efforts by Malaysia to defend palm oil against criticism have met mixed reviews. In 2009 Britain’s Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), a group that regulates advertisements, banned a “misleading” ad by the palm oil industry. Bloggers and journalists have also complained about a deluge of comment spam whenever they post an article critical of palm oil.

The oil palm is the world’s most productive commercial oil seed. Palm oil is used widely as a cooking oil and in processed food products, cosmetics, and cleaning agents. Europe is considering importing palm oil biodiesel to help meet renewable fuels targets, although recent scientific research indicates that greenhouse gas emissions savings from switching to palm oil from conventional fossil fuels are non-existent when forests and peatlands are cleared to produce palm oil.

MAKES ME SO ANGRY! NOT DAMAGING TO THE ENVIRONMENT????? AARRRGGGHH

 How a monoculture can be more advantageous over the biologically productive ecosystem is beyond me. A ploy for instant monetary gratification - no doubt it supports many thousands of plantation workers - but the price paid in the long term comes out of everyone’s, not just Malaysian’s pockets.

To call it anything else is adding insult to injury. “Not damaging” as evidenced by Malaysia’s "56.4 per cent forest cover"? Conveniently legislation was passed to name monoculture as "forest". It’s so transparent I can’t believe they are even trying. 

I’m heartbroken by this news. Malaysia is where I fell in love with Rainforests.  And I love the country, the food, the people, the language. But I grew up watching rubber plantations turn to palm oil, and then spread and spread until there are literally just pockets of Rainforest left on the Peninsula, let alone the unchecked pillage of Sabah’s forests. Now they’re going after Sarawak?

Malaysia should be proud of it’s natural reserves, not in it’s ability to decimate them.

MALAYSIA TRULY ASIA? What. ever.