halfman-halfocean

The sting from a Portuguese man-of-war hurts like hell, so most people avoid the jellyfish-like creatures. Not Aaron Ansarov — he and his wife don rubber gloves and collect them when they wash up on the beach near their home in Delray Beach, Florida.

They take the creatures back to their house and Ansarov photographs them on a makeshift light table and then mirrors the image in Photoshop. He shot dozens of them this past winter and the result is a unique, psychedelic portfolio.

Brave Art

deepseanews
deepseanews:

Men o’ war jellyfish washed up on South Padre Island, Texas.

Contrary to popular belief, the Portuguese Man O’ War (Physalia physalis) is actually a colonial hydroid. Each individual animal (zooid) specializes in function and are joined together and physiologically integrated to the point where they would not survive separately. 

deepseanews:

Men o’ war jellyfish washed up on South Padre Island, Texas.

Contrary to popular belief, the Portuguese Man O’ War (Physalia physalis) is actually a colonial hydroid. Each individual animal (zooid) specializes in function and are joined together and physiologically integrated to the point where they would not survive separately. 

Super Jellyfish?! by Dr. M from Deep Sea News
The above photo is making the rounds (see here and follow the link trail).  In it the a scuba diver is next to Lion’s Mane Jellyfish.  But I’m calling bullshit on this photo.
Lion’s Maine Jellyfish are indeed big.  The world record had a bell diameter of 7 and half feet (2.29m) and 120 ft long tentacles (37m).I know this because for this paper, I needed data for the largest and smallest species for every animal phylum.

Being a connoisseur of photos of all size extremes, I immediately noted something was off.  Let’s assume the scuba diver is only 5 feet (1.5m) in height.  The width of the jellyfish’s bell is about 3 of  the scuba diver’s length or 15 feet (4.57m).  This would make it twice the size of the world’s largest known specimen.  Zoom in on the diver in the photo and you can see a characteristic Photoshop halo. As well, the hue, shadows, and saturation of the diver don’t match the rest of the photograph.  I also find it interesting I can’t locate any high resolution versions of this image.
A little searching around the internet and I found a photo without diver but it appears Photoshopped as well. Note the oddly light area where the diver was.

So Lion’s Mane Jellyfish…really big, just not that big.

Super Jellyfish?! by Dr. M from Deep Sea News

The above photo is making the rounds (see here and follow the link trail).  In it the a scuba diver is next to Lion’s Mane Jellyfish.  But I’m calling bullshit on this photo.

Lion’s Maine Jellyfish are indeed big.  The world record had a bell diameter of 7 and half feet (2.29m) and 120 ft long tentacles (37m).I know this because for this paper, I needed data for the largest and smallest species for every animal phylum.

Being a connoisseur of photos of all size extremes, I immediately noted something was off.  Let’s assume the scuba diver is only 5 feet (1.5m) in height.  The width of the jellyfish’s bell is about 3 of  the scuba diver’s length or 15 feet (4.57m).  This would make it twice the size of the world’s largest known specimen.  Zoom in on the diver in the photo and you can see a characteristic Photoshop halo. As well, the hue, shadows, and saturation of the diver don’t match the rest of the photograph.  I also find it interesting I can’t locate any high resolution versions of this image.

A little searching around the internet and I found a photo without diver but it appears Photoshopped as well. Note the oddly light area where the diver was.

So Lion’s Mane Jellyfish…really big, just not that big.

the-camera-trap
the-camera-trap:

Corals like this Acropora sp. are able to withstand exposure but not for long. If they are exposed too long on a extremely low spring tide like this then the UV damage and the temperature fluctuation will eventually kill them. Of course not before they lose all their symbiotic algae living within them and turn white giving them the appearance of being ‘bleached’.
sexyactionplanet:

Exposed coral (Acropora sp.) due to a 0m low tide! 

the-camera-trap:

Corals like this Acropora sp. are able to withstand exposure but not for long. If they are exposed too long on a extremely low spring tide like this then the UV damage and the temperature fluctuation will eventually kill them. Of course not before they lose all their symbiotic algae living within them and turn white giving them the appearance of being ‘bleached’.

sexyactionplanet:

Exposed coral (Acropora sp.) due to a 0m low tide! 

Irukandji Jellyfish
There are actually two species of Jellyfish (Carukia barnesi and the recently discovered Malo kingi) - and they are thought to be the most venomous creatures in the world.
Their bite is definitely bigger than their bark - its size is roughly no larger than a cubic centimetre (1 cm³) and yet its venom is very powerful, 100 times as potent as that of a cobra and 1,000 times as potent as that of a tarantula.
The Irukandji are unique from other jellies in two prominent ways: they have stingers on their ‘bell’ as well as their tentacles, and they have the ability to fire stingers from the tips and inject venom.
Irukandji jellyfish were at one time thought to be in the northern waters of Australia only. Since then, according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish, the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, the Florida coast of the United States.

Irukandji Jellyfish

There are actually two species of Jellyfish (Carukia barnesi and the recently discovered Malo kingi) - and they are thought to be the most venomous creatures in the world.

Their bite is definitely bigger than their bark - its size is roughly no larger than a cubic centimetre (1 cm³) and yet its venom is very powerful, 100 times as potent as that of a cobra and 1,000 times as potent as that of a tarantula.

The Irukandji are unique from other jellies in two prominent ways: they have stingers on their ‘bell’ as well as their tentacles, and they have the ability to fire stingers from the tips and inject venom.

Irukandji jellyfish were at one time thought to be in the northern waters of Australia only. Since then, according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish, the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, the Florida coast of the United States.

Sea pens. New Zealand, 2006.
© Brian Skerry
(via Conservation International)
Sea pens are colonial marine cnidarians belonging to the order Pennatulacea. Sea pens are grouped with the octocorals (“soft corals”), together with sea whips and gorgonians.
Unlike other octocorals, however, a sea pen’s polyps are specialized to specific functions: a single polyp develops into a rigid, erect stalk (the rachis) and loses its tentacles, forming a bulbous “root” or peduncle at its base. The other polyps branch out from this central stalk, forming water intake structures (siphonozooids), feeding structures (autozooids) with nematocysts, and reproductive structures. The entire colony is fortified by calcium carbonate in the form of spicules and a central axial rod.

Sea pens. New Zealand, 2006.

© Brian Skerry

(via Conservation International)

Sea pens are colonial marine cnidarians belonging to the order Pennatulacea. Sea pens are grouped with the octocorals (“soft corals”), together with sea whips and gorgonians.

Unlike other octocorals, however, a sea pen’s polyps are specialized to specific functions: a single polyp develops into a rigid, erect stalk (the rachis) and loses its tentacles, forming a bulbous “root” or peduncle at its base. The other polyps branch out from this central stalk, forming water intake structures (siphonozooids), feeding structures (autozooids) with nematocysts, and reproductive structures. The entire colony is fortified by calcium carbonate in the form of spicules and a central axial rod.