Safety in Numbers? Not So for Corals
"The last 10 thousand years have been especially beneficial for corals. Acropora species, such as table coral, elkhorn coral and staghorn coral, were favored in competition due to their rapid growth. This advantageous rapid growth may have been attained in part by neglecting investment in few defenses against predation, hurricanes, or warm seawater. Acropora species have porous skeletons, extra thin tissue, and low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in their tissues. The abundant corals have taken an easy road to living a rich and dominating life during the present interglacial period, but the payback comes when the climate becomes less hospitable.”
Read more
University of Hawaii (2013, November 15). Safety in numbers? Not so for corals. ScienceDaily. 
Silly Acropora cut corners in Evolution class.

Safety in Numbers? Not So for Corals

"The last 10 thousand years have been especially beneficial for corals. Acropora species, such as table coral, elkhorn coral and staghorn coral, were favored in competition due to their rapid growth. This advantageous rapid growth may have been attained in part by neglecting investment in few defenses against predation, hurricanes, or warm seawater. Acropora species have porous skeletons, extra thin tissue, and low concentrations of carbon and nitrogen in their tissues. The abundant corals have taken an easy road to living a rich and dominating life during the present interglacial period, but the payback comes when the climate becomes less hospitable.”

Read more

University of Hawaii (2013, November 15). Safety in numbers? Not so for corals. ScienceDaily. 

Silly Acropora cut corners in Evolution class.

griseus
griseus:

CORALS VS ACIDIFYING OCEANS
In a world-first, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) have shown that tropical corals have the ability to fight back against acidifying oceans caused by human emissions of carbon dioxide.
While the threat of coral bleaching from higher sea-surface temperatures and direct human impacts still present serious risks to the long-term prospects for coral reefs, the research findings suggest that many corals have the ability to largely offset the effects of increasingly acidic oceans.
Researchers used a boron isotope technique to calculate the effects of the acidification process on coral growth rate and found that almost all coral species are able to reduce the pH of the seawater they take in
More Info: Science Alert
Photo: Ethan Daniels
Reference: Coral resilience to ocean acidification and global warming through pH up-regulation” by Malcolm McCulloch, Jim Falter, Julie Trotter and Paolo Montagna appears in the journal Nature Climate Change

griseus:

CORALS VS ACIDIFYING OCEANS

In a world-first, scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS) have shown that tropical corals have the ability to fight back against acidifying oceans caused by human emissions of carbon dioxide.

While the threat of coral bleaching from higher sea-surface temperatures and direct human impacts still present serious risks to the long-term prospects for coral reefs, the research findings suggest that many corals have the ability to largely offset the effects of increasingly acidic oceans.

Researchers used a boron isotope technique to calculate the effects of the acidification process on coral growth rate and found that almost all coral species are able to reduce the pH of the seawater they take in

lyfeforms asked:

Hey I am a freshman in college and I'm intending on majoring in marine biology. I've always loved every aspect of the ocean but what I'd really like to focus on is coral reef preservation and sharks. I am thinking of studying abroad in Australia through my college. Do you have any advice or thoughts on going to Australia? I mean for coral reef studies and shark studies I think it's a good place to go but do you have any other countries that would be good?

I think Oz sounds like a great place to study either in terms of Academic infrastructure. There are some very well renown Universities there. I haven’t studied there but you could always ask marine-science or ~eduardo - for some advice! 

The Coral Song - by AJ Jenkins

Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you the new soundtrack to my life. My work with the conservation project Green Fins is all about getting divers to help protect the reef, and reaching out to local communities to do the same. Whilst most divers and dive guides are fairly knowledgeable about the reef, I’ve met plenty of people, tourists and locals alike, who don’t know that coral is alive. 

This is the soundtrack for all my future presentations. And the song that will be in my head for the rest of the week. And I don’t even mind. 

Go ahead. Enjoy. Sing. Share. 

underthevastblueseas
underthevastblueseas:


Here’s a picture of a healthy sample of the Great Barrier Reef. Next to it is a sample that was exposed to CO2 levels we can expect if we do nothing about climate change.
via: 350.org

Algal growth over dead coral prevents coral recruits from settling and re-establishing the coral reef. Algae ecosystems support less diversity of life. This year is predicted to be a bad year in the Asia-Pacific for Coral Bleaching so keep an eye out! 

underthevastblueseas:

Here’s a picture of a healthy sample of the Great Barrier Reef. Next to it is a sample that was exposed to CO2 levels we can expect if we do nothing about climate change.
via: 350.org

Algal growth over dead coral prevents coral recruits from settling and re-establishing the coral reef. Algae ecosystems support less diversity of life. This year is predicted to be a bad year in the Asia-Pacific for Coral Bleaching so keep an eye out! 

climateadaptation

climateadaptation:

A recent study(freePDF) from Stanford University published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) considers how some reef building corals resist the stress of warmer waters that has caused coral bleaching around the world.

Using comparative genomics, researchers found that the heat tolerant corals have prepared for heat by switching on a set of 60 particular genes. Other coral species have also been found to switch on these genes but only after stress has already occurred. Resilient Samoan corals, however, have these genes switched on all of the time.

The results of the study show that some corals have the ability to withstand future increases in ocean temperature and highlight efforts to protect these resilient places.

Learn more at: http://www.oceansciencenow.com/wp/. The full PNAS article can also be found online here.

Mushroom coral
Family: Fungiidae
El Nido, Philippines
Many corals are nocturnal feeding. During the day you can clearly see their calcium carbonate skeleton, tinted with the colours of the zooxanthellae in the retracted coral polyps. 
In the case of mushroom coral, the polyps are solitary, not colonial, meaning that each round disc of coral is one animal. The mouth is located centrally and is surrounded by tentacles. 

Mushroom coral

Family: Fungiidae

El Nido, Philippines

Many corals are nocturnal feeding. During the day you can clearly see their calcium carbonate skeleton, tinted with the colours of the zooxanthellae in the retracted coral polyps. 

In the case of mushroom coral, the polyps are solitary, not colonial, meaning that each round disc of coral is one animal. The mouth is located centrally and is surrounded by tentacles.