The Coral Song - by AJ Jenkins

Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you the new soundtrack to my life. My work with the conservation project Green Fins is all about getting divers to help protect the reef, and reaching out to local communities to do the same. Whilst most divers and dive guides are fairly knowledgeable about the reef, I’ve met plenty of people, tourists and locals alike, who don’t know that coral is alive. 

This is the soundtrack for all my future presentations. And the song that will be in my head for the rest of the week. And I don’t even mind. 

Go ahead. Enjoy. Sing. Share. 

I’m happy to announce that I’ve been invited to guest blog by the lovely chaps over at biology-online.org. The website is a great go-to for all things biology, with forums, discussion boards, articles, definitions, tutorials etc. 

Who would I be if my first post wasn’t about my long-time loves, the Nudibranchia? Check it out

In response to many, but no particular ‘ask’ - do not allow any blogger to be a replacement for your own research.
You guys ask me a lot of questions, many of them are awesome, well though out questions, and I don’t answer them fast enough, and for that I apologise. 
However, certain questions make me shake my head in exasperation. I’m not google. In fact, to answer some of these questions, I do just head to google and type in the same text that was sent to me. 
It’s a waste of my time, but more importantly yours. Being told the answer is not learning. I’ve done all the work for you, and I’m the better for it. But that doesn’t really help you…does it?
Learning is more than getting the answer and ticking that box, or getting a good grade. It’s about the process. The critical analysis you exercise by reading different sources, by not believing everything Wikipedia tells you, by forming your own opinion, is priceless. 
It’s not the easier option, but don’t be scared to flex those muscles, to make mistakes, to get constructive feedback. It will help you grow as a biologist, as a scientist, as a person. I refuse to steal this from you. 
Ask me my opinion, ask for guidance on where to start looking, ask context, ask for advice, but not for an answer you can find on your own. 
Let sites like Google Scholar be your friend. Find sites where your scientist heros like Joe or David, or any of the Southern Fried Scientist, Deep Sea News or Sea Monster team’s blogs and get some context. Keep up with the latest.
Feed your own mind. You’re never too young to start.

In response to many, but no particular ‘ask’ - do not allow any blogger to be a replacement for your own research.

You guys ask me a lot of questions, many of them are awesome, well though out questions, and I don’t answer them fast enough, and for that I apologise. 

However, certain questions make me shake my head in exasperation. I’m not google. In fact, to answer some of these questions, I do just head to google and type in the same text that was sent to me. 

It’s a waste of my time, but more importantly yours. Being told the answer is not learning. I’ve done all the work for you, and I’m the better for it. But that doesn’t really help you…does it?

Learning is more than getting the answer and ticking that box, or getting a good grade. It’s about the process. The critical analysis you exercise by reading different sources, by not believing everything Wikipedia tells you, by forming your own opinion, is priceless. 

It’s not the easier option, but don’t be scared to flex those muscles, to make mistakes, to get constructive feedback. It will help you grow as a biologist, as a scientist, as a person. I refuse to steal this from you. 

Ask me my opinion, ask for guidance on where to start looking, ask context, ask for advice, but not for an answer you can find on your own. 

Let sites like Google Scholar be your friend. Find sites where your scientist heros like Joe or David, or any of the Southern Fried Scientist, Deep Sea News or Sea Monster team’s blogs and get some context. Keep up with the latest.

Feed your own mind. You’re never too young to start.

earthandscience

earthandscience:

somuchscience:

Phylo! The ecological, biology-based trading card game

Officially the NERDIEST GAME EVER!!!

Build ecosystems, food chains, webs of competition, parasitism, and coexistence. Learn more and print out your own cards (FREE) and your very own deck (FREE!) here.

Want!

The super awesome mollusc is the same number of points as the super massive mammal. Well… yes please. 

Today is the official launch of the #sharkstanley children’s book by @sharkdefenders and @SAGEmagazine. 

Excellent job guys - I think it’s impressive that you can communicate such a complex issue into a children’s book, and it will be such a useful tool for any future shark awareness campaigns with schools! 

Now we know that shark-finning’s a terrible deed,

But don’t blame the fisher for trying to feed

His wife and his children, perhaps living in squalor.

So he sells the shark fins, and he makes a good dollar.

And the fins then get sent, in a single fell swoop

To be dried and shipped out and turned into soup

So that some pricey restaurants, from Hong Kong to New York,

Can sell bowls of shark soup with their chicken or pork.

But here’s the dirtiest secret: it doesn’t taste very good!

People just eat it ‘cause they think that they should.

So millions of sharks get de-finned every year

For the sake of becoming just a food souvenir.

jtotheizzoe

jtotheizzoe:

Thank you, everyone.

I want to start by saying that, because without all of you reading, sharing and supporting this science blog over the past couple years, today’s announcement would never be happening.

Starting today, It’s Okay To Be Smart is also a YouTube series from PBS Digital Studios! I’ll be teaching you about science in fun, creative, unique and quirky ways, just like I always have, only now you get to watch and listen instead of just reading along. Here’s my first episode, “Life By The Numbers,” which looks at just how many things there are on Earth.

I can’t tell you how excited I am to be doing this, or that I get to work with PBS. I grew up with PBS and their programming is a large part of what made me realize the value of combining education with creativity. I feel like me and Big Bird are basically co-workers now. We’ll be posting a new episode every other week on our YouTube page, and I’ll still be maintaining this blog like always. You’ll even get added bonus material to go along with each episode and expand your knowledge that much more.

Here’s how you can help:

  • Share this awesome science channel with your friends on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Reddit or wherever you like to hang around on the internet. If you could get Neil deGrasse Tyson to watch, that would be great.
  • Subscribe to our YouTube channel so you don’t miss any future episodes. Seriously, subscribe :)
  • Speak up and leave us a comment telling us what you think of the show, any questions you have, and if there’s something you’d like to see in a future episode. You can also email me at itsokaytobesmart <at> gmail <dot> com.
  • Sit back … enjoy the showand expand your knowledge and your curiosity!

Let’s go learn something amazing together! Stay curious, everyone.

Joe has been an amazing Tumblr teacher over the years. Now his lessons are formed in another (awesome) medium. Check it out! 

Congratulations Joe, this is *really* cool.