Showing 9 posts tagged fauna

High-res sexyactionplanet:

This card will grow into an Australian shrub known as a ‘bottlebrush’. These free seed-infused, biodegradable cards are the RSPCA’s new initiative to encourage native plants and wildlife in suburbia. Fantastic idea don’t you think?

A card that grows into a tree. Amazing.

sexyactionplanet:

This card will grow into an Australian shrub known as a ‘bottlebrush’. These free seed-infused, biodegradable cards are the RSPCA’s new initiative to encourage native plants and wildlife in suburbia. Fantastic idea don’t you think?

A card that grows into a tree. Amazing.

High-res 
Hawksbill Turtle, Red Sea
Photograph by David Doubilet, National Geographic

In 1975, in recognition of its Endangered status, the Hawksbill was included on Appendices I (Atlantic population) and II (Pacific population) of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in EndangeredSpecies of Wild Fauna and Flora, when the Convention came into force. By 1977 the entire species was moved to Appendix I to prohibit all international trade. Nevertheless, the global trade continued for a number of years, in large part driven by Japanese demand. At the end of 1992, Japanese imports ceased, but the industry continues to operate with stockpiled materials. 
Source: IUCN

Hawksbill Turtle, Red Sea

Photograph by David Doubilet, National Geographic

In 1975, in recognition of its Endangered status, the Hawksbill was included on Appendices I (Atlantic population) and II (Pacific population) of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in EndangeredSpecies of Wild Fauna and Flora, when the Convention came into force. By 1977 the entire species was moved to Appendix I to prohibit all international trade. Nevertheless, the global trade continued for a number of years, in large part driven by Japanese demand. At the end of 1992, Japanese imports ceased, but the industry continues to operate with stockpiled materials. 

Source: IUCN

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headlikeanorange:

This odd couple consists of a goby and a shrimp. The shrimp, who has poor eyesight, dug their burrow and keeps it clean, while the goby is on the lookout for predators. It pushes the shrimp down the burrow when it detects danger. (Desert Seas - National Geographic Channel)

The goby signals ‘levels’ of danger by different flicks of it’s tail. The shrimp can detect the vibrations and stay in the burrow until the threat disappears, or the Goby retreats. 

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