Giant Squid Linkfest by Dr. M

To get you prepped for the large unleashing of Discovery Channel’s Looking for the Giant Squid this Sunday below is all the required reading.

First the background on the video

The giant squid has been captured on video in its natural habitat for the first time ever.  This long-sought after footage — considered by many to be the Holy Grail of natural history filmmaking — will be revealed by Discovery Channel and NHK in January 2013…This massive predator has always been shrouded in secrecy, and every attempt to capture a live giant squid on camera in its natural habitat has failed. Until now. Mankind finally confronts the greatest mystery of the deep as the first-ever footage of a live giant squid in its natural habitat is revealed in Discovery Channel’s Monster Squid: The Giant Is Real, which premieres on Sunday, January 27, 2013 at 10/9c as the season finale of Curiosity. NHK will air their special on the first-ever footage of the giant squid in early January 2013.

Also read over my post to understand this video in the context of other recent encounters with giant squid.

Want to see a hint of what Discovery Channel might reveal?

Here’s my post (Giant Squid=Awesomesauce) that will give you everything you want to know about giant squids.

And of course not only is Discovery continuing on with the Monster terminology but so are others.  Read here on why this pisses me off.

Arikia Millikin provides some background on this amazing event (and of course I would shamelessly plug it as I’m mentioned relatively early on).  Best quote is Steve O’Shea stating “we all have to be a little bit crazy to do this”

Every wonder why of all the ocean’s creatures we picked the giant squid to grace our banner and brand the DSN media empire?  In this post, I detail out why giant squids should be a emblem for marine conservation. “What is the emblematic species of the ocean that will serve to energize and unite us?”

Brian Switek provides some perspective on the balance between the actual giant squid and the images invoked when culturally reference them

How do you get a giant squid?  With a big lighted lure apparently.  Here is old video from National Geographic 

about using bioluminescence to attract a giant squid.

And finally what about some photographs of a sperm whale eating a giant squid?

Source: Dr. M from Deep Sea News

The Right Stuff
The Mercury 7 had it, and Ed Harris had it when he played John Glenn in the film “The Right Stuff" based on Tom Wolfe’s book. 
It’s about the jump from Test Pilots who were breaking Mach 1 and 2 to the selection process and missions of Project Mercury. 
It is an epic film, a real testament to the time of the Space Race and to the story of those brave and awesome men and their families. 

The Right Stuff

The Mercury 7 had it, and Ed Harris had it when he played John Glenn in the film “The Right Stuff" based on Tom Wolfe’s book. 

It’s about the jump from Test Pilots who were breaking Mach 1 and 2 to the selection process and missions of Project Mercury. 

It is an epic film, a real testament to the time of the Space Race and to the story of those brave and awesome men and their families. 

The Jaws effect: why we misunderstand sharks
Photo: The Gulf Stream by Winslow Homer (1899)
Article From Nat Geo (by Patrick Kiger, HT to Abel V):
Audiences cringed in terror as they watched the 1975 movie thriller Jaws, which depicted shark hunters’ desperate struggle to survive an encounter with a monstrous aquatic serial killer that was powerful enough to turn their fishing cruiser into splinters, and was relentless in its frenzied lust for human flesh.
But while Jaws was an escapist fantasy rather than an accurate depiction of sharks, the public didn’t grasp that distinction. In July 1975, a month after the film’s release, the New York Times reported that authorities up and down the East Coast were inundated with reports of shark sightings—most of them probably erroneous—by anxious beachgoers and recreational fishermen. The hysteria provided still more fuel for the widespread stereotype that sharks are evil, vicious, and menaces to humanity that must be feared, if not eradicated.
With the release of Jaws in 1975, and the sequels that followed, pushed the fear of sharks to new and outlandish extremes. Interestingly, Peter Benchley, who wrote both the novel that inspired the film and co-authored the screenplay, eventually came to regret his role in creating the image of sharks as killing machines, and immersed himself in efforts to educate the public about sharks and the need to protect them from extinction, according to his 2006 Los Angeles Times obituary. “Knowing what I know now, I could never write that book today,” he explained in a British newspaper interview. “Sharks don’t target human beings, and they certainly don’t hold grudges.”

The Jaws effect: why we misunderstand sharks

Photo: The Gulf Stream by Winslow Homer (1899)

Article From Nat Geo (by Patrick Kiger, HT to Abel V):

Audiences cringed in terror as they watched the 1975 movie thriller Jaws, which depicted shark hunters’ desperate struggle to survive an encounter with a monstrous aquatic serial killer that was powerful enough to turn their fishing cruiser into splinters, and was relentless in its frenzied lust for human flesh.

But while Jaws was an escapist fantasy rather than an accurate depiction of sharks, the public didn’t grasp that distinction. In July 1975, a month after the film’s release, the New York Times reported that authorities up and down the East Coast were inundated with reports of shark sightings—most of them probably erroneous—by anxious beachgoers and recreational fishermen. The hysteria provided still more fuel for the widespread stereotype that sharks are evil, vicious, and menaces to humanity that must be feared, if not eradicated.

With the release of Jaws in 1975, and the sequels that followed, pushed the fear of sharks to new and outlandish extremes. Interestingly, Peter Benchley, who wrote both the novel that inspired the film and co-authored the screenplay, eventually came to regret his role in creating the image of sharks as killing machines, and immersed himself in efforts to educate the public about sharks and the need to protect them from extinction, according to his 2006 Los Angeles Times obituary. “Knowing what I know now, I could never write that book today,” he explained in a British newspaper interview. “Sharks don’t target human beings, and they certainly don’t hold grudges.”

Mr Miller set up the rig of timelapse equipment to capture the growing brinicle under the ice at Little Razorback Island, near Antarctica’s Ross Archipelago.
"When we were exploring around that island we came across an area where there had been three or four [brinicles] previously and there was one actually happening," Mr Miller told BBC Nature.
"The one we’d seen a week before was getting longer in front of our eyes… the whole thing only took five, six hours."
The location - beneath the ice off the foothills of the volcano Mount Erebus, in water as cold as -2C - was not easy to access.
"That particular patch was difficult to get to. It was a long way from the hole and it was quite narrow at times between the sea bed and the ice," explained Mr Miller.
Source: BBC Nature 

Mr Miller set up the rig of timelapse equipment to capture the growing brinicle under the ice at Little Razorback Island, near Antarctica’s Ross Archipelago.

"When we were exploring around that island we came across an area where there had been three or four [brinicles] previously and there was one actually happening," Mr Miller told BBC Nature.

"The one we’d seen a week before was getting longer in front of our eyes… the whole thing only took five, six hours."

The location - beneath the ice off the foothills of the volcano Mount Erebus, in water as cold as -2C - was not easy to access.

"That particular patch was difficult to get to. It was a long way from the hole and it was quite narrow at times between the sea bed and the ice," explained Mr Miller.

Source: BBC Nature 

James Cameron dives deep for Avatar
Only once before has anyone made the seven-mile descent into the Pacific’s Mariana trench, the deepest point on earth. Now film-maker James Cameron wants to repeat that incredible journey for his Avatar sequel
Film director James Cameron – the man behind Avatar, Aliens, and aptly, The Abyss – has gathered a team of engineers and given them the job of building a submersible capable of returning to the Mariana trench. Cameron, who has filmed on the wreck of the Titanic, has said he plans to use his new submersible to gather footage for a sequel to Avatar. The vessel is being assembled in Australia and tests on the hull are already completed. Insiders say a trial dive could be on the cards later this year.
The prospect of a return to the Mariana trench comes as scientists are just beginning to understand the importance of the deepest realms of the oceans. These are habitats with extraordinary and unique lifeforms; places that behave like deepwater stores for the carbon locked up in marine life when that life comes to an end and gravity drags them down.
Read More (The Guardian) 

James Cameron dives deep for Avatar

Only once before has anyone made the seven-mile descent into the Pacific’s Mariana trench, the deepest point on earth. Now film-maker James Cameron wants to repeat that incredible journey for his Avatar sequel

Film director James Cameron – the man behind Avatar, Aliens, and aptly, The Abyss – has gathered a team of engineers and given them the job of building a submersible capable of returning to the Mariana trench. Cameron, who has filmed on the wreck of the Titanic, has said he plans to use his new submersible to gather footage for a sequel to Avatar. The vessel is being assembled in Australia and tests on the hull are already completed. Insiders say a trial dive could be on the cards later this year.

The prospect of a return to the Mariana trench comes as scientists are just beginning to understand the importance of the deepest realms of the oceans. These are habitats with extraordinary and unique lifeforms; places that behave like deepwater stores for the carbon locked up in marine life when that life comes to an end and gravity drags them down.

Read More (The Guardian)