sexyactionplanet:

This is actually a really good book by Alan Weisman about what would happen to the world if human beings just simply vanished. What would happen to our buildings and cities, the landscape, animal populations and more if human maintenance and pressure just disappeared… It is very eye-opening and some of it is very surprising! A fantastic read I highly recommend. Find out more here.

I’d like to take a minute to point out that this book is so good that sexyactionplanet borrowed it and NEVER GAVE IT BACK. To be fair, it is an excellent read and a real eye opener. 

sexyactionplanet:

This is actually a really good book by Alan Weisman about what would happen to the world if human beings just simply vanished. What would happen to our buildings and cities, the landscape, animal populations and more if human maintenance and pressure just disappeared… It is very eye-opening and some of it is very surprising! A fantastic read I highly recommend. Find out more here.

I’d like to take a minute to point out that this book is so good that sexyactionplanet borrowed it and NEVER GAVE IT BACK. To be fair, it is an excellent read and a real eye opener. 

zewildside:

Good news, everyone! 

The Irrawaddy River Dolphin is a freshwater dolphin species. Prior to January 2012, it was thought that there were less than 100 left in the world, living in freshwater rivers and lagoons in southeast Asia. But about a month ago, 6,000 more of these dolphins were found around Bangladesh. Hope for the future!!

Source- Wildlife Conservation Society

(via good-conservation-news)

High-res Mata Mata
These aquatic turtles are masters of disguise. Their flat heads, jagged skin and shells make them look like rocks or bark in the water. Even though they live in fresh water, these guys are lousy swimmers. They walk along the bottom and prefer to stay in shallow depths.
Unlike many turtles who keep their heads above the water, this species pokes its thorny snout (one of it’s many protuberances) just above the surface while keeping the rest of its body submerged. When catching its food, the turtle (who can’t chew) opens its mouth and sucks in its prey, swallowing it whole.
The Mata Mata lives in South America near the Orinoco and Amazon Rivers in Brazil and Venezuela.

Mata Mata

These aquatic turtles are masters of disguise. Their flat heads, jagged skin and shells make them look like rocks or bark in the water. Even though they live in fresh water, these guys are lousy swimmers. They walk along the bottom and prefer to stay in shallow depths.

Unlike many turtles who keep their heads above the water, this species pokes its thorny snout (one of it’s many protuberances) just above the surface while keeping the rest of its body submerged. When catching its food, the turtle (who can’t chew) opens its mouth and sucks in its prey, swallowing it whole.

The Mata Mata lives in South America near the Orinoco and Amazon Rivers in Brazil and Venezuela.

Fish disperse seeds. What?!

When we think of seed dispersal, fish aren’t generally the first facilitators to come to mind. Or even at all. But new evidence demonstrates that the consumption of fruits by fish in freshwater environments is in fact a widespread phenomenon that has been documented in all biogeographic regions involving more than 275 fish species and numerous plants.

Seed dispersal by fish is not news, but having been thought to be specific to a few species in discrete areas, and therefore has been neglected in the past. Earlier this year characids were shown to carry seeds from over five kilometres away in flooded forests!

The authors of the review article in question highlight the requirement for immediate attention to the threats that affect icthyochory (fish seed dispersal) such as overfishing, damming of rivers, deforestation and logging.

Journal Article

P.S. Icthyochory is a fantastic word.

High-res A giant water bug has been photographed eating a juvenile turtle in an unusual predatory role reversal.
Large bugs in the Lethocerinae family have been known to prey upon small vertebrates including fish and frogs.
Using its front legs the giant water bug gripped the turtle, inserting its syringe-like rostrum into the prey’s neck in order to feed.  The giant water bugs are known to only attack moving prey, so it is likely that the 58mm insect captured and killed the young turtle before feeding on it.  Dr Ohba has also photographed giant water bugs eating snakes in the past.

A giant water bug has been photographed eating a juvenile turtle in an unusual predatory role reversal.

Large bugs in the Lethocerinae family have been known to prey upon small vertebrates including fish and frogs.

Using its front legs the giant water bug gripped the turtle, inserting its syringe-like rostrum into the prey’s neck in order to feed. The giant water bugs are known to only attack moving prey, so it is likely that the 58mm insect captured and killed the young turtle before feeding on it. Dr Ohba has also photographed giant water bugs eating snakes in the past.

  • BBC