halfman-halfocean

The sting from a Portuguese man-of-war hurts like hell, so most people avoid the jellyfish-like creatures. Not Aaron Ansarov — he and his wife don rubber gloves and collect them when they wash up on the beach near their home in Delray Beach, Florida.

They take the creatures back to their house and Ansarov photographs them on a makeshift light table and then mirrors the image in Photoshop. He shot dozens of them this past winter and the result is a unique, psychedelic portfolio.

Brave Art

deepseanews
deepseanews:

Men o’ war jellyfish washed up on South Padre Island, Texas.

Contrary to popular belief, the Portuguese Man O’ War (Physalia physalis) is actually a colonial hydroid. Each individual animal (zooid) specializes in function and are joined together and physiologically integrated to the point where they would not survive separately. 

deepseanews:

Men o’ war jellyfish washed up on South Padre Island, Texas.

Contrary to popular belief, the Portuguese Man O’ War (Physalia physalis) is actually a colonial hydroid. Each individual animal (zooid) specializes in function and are joined together and physiologically integrated to the point where they would not survive separately. 

Threadfin Hawkfish (Cirrhitichthys aprinus) by Paul Sutten
Hawkfish share many morphological features with the scorpionfish of the family Scorpaenidae.
Thanks to their large, skinless pectoral fins, hawkfish are able to perch upon fire corals without incurring harm. Actually hydrozoans rather than true corals, fire corals possess stinging cells called nematocysts which would normally prevent close contact.
Afforded some degree of protection by their living perches, hawkfish seek the high ground of the reef where they warily survey their surroundings; redolent of a hawk’s behaviour, this habit inspired their common name.

Threadfin Hawkfish (Cirrhitichthys aprinus) by Paul Sutten

Hawkfish share many morphological features with the scorpionfish of the family Scorpaenidae.

Thanks to their large, skinless pectoral fins, hawkfish are able to perch upon fire corals without incurring harm. Actually hydrozoans rather than true corals, fire corals possess stinging cells called nematocysts which would normally prevent close contact.

Afforded some degree of protection by their living perches, hawkfish seek the high ground of the reef where they warily survey their surroundings; redolent of a hawk’s behaviour, this habit inspired their common name.