Showing 15 posts tagged lizard

High-res mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Animals in captivity: Sailfin Iguana [Hydrosaurus spp.]
These relatively large lizards are named after the sail-like structure on their tail. They are native to the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea where generally found near water, such as rivers. They are the only members of the Hydrosaurinae subfamily.

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Animals in captivity: Sailfin Iguana [Hydrosaurus spp.]

These relatively large lizards are named after the sail-like structure on their tail. They are native to the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea where generally found near water, such as rivers. They are the only members of the Hydrosaurinae subfamily.

High-res Animals in captivity: Sailfin Iguana [Hydrosaurus spp.]
These relatively large lizards are named after the sail-like structure on their tail. They are native to the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea where generally found near water, such as rivers. They are the only members of the Hydrosaurinae subfamily.

Animals in captivity: Sailfin Iguana [Hydrosaurus spp.]

These relatively large lizards are named after the sail-like structure on their tail. They are native to the Philippines, Indonesia and Papua New Guinea where generally found near water, such as rivers. They are the only members of the Hydrosaurinae subfamily.

High-res take-nothing-but-photos:

Stuff I’ve seen
This guy found me in the rainforest on Tioman. I looked down and it was just hanging out on my shirt. Still struggling to work out exactly what it is, some type of Calotes Sp. I think.
It also did something very cool. In this picture it is bright green, but when we released it onto the forest floor it instantly turned brown. As if that wasn’t enough, when it made it to a lichen covered rock it changed greyish with flecks of green!

 Ang, it looks like a baby Chameleon Anglehead! Look at his little eye!

take-nothing-but-photos:

Stuff I’ve seen

This guy found me in the rainforest on Tioman. I looked down and it was just hanging out on my shirt. Still struggling to work out exactly what it is, some type of Calotes Sp. I think.

It also did something very cool. In this picture it is bright green, but when we released it onto the forest floor it instantly turned brown. As if that wasn’t enough, when it made it to a lichen covered rock it changed greyish with flecks of green!

 Ang, it looks like a baby Chameleon Anglehead! Look at his little eye!