It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

Hunter S. Thompson

"While he was talking about piracy and salvage in the Florida Keys, there is an ecological attractiveness in this statement that cuts to the core of our relationship with the ocean and sharks in particular." - IUCN

High-res UK’s Deep Sea Mountain Life Filmed
by Victoria Gill, BBC
Scientists have sent a remotely operated vehicle to film one of the UK’s three undersea mountains, known as seamounts.
The Hebrides Terrace Seamount, off the west coast of Scotland, is higher than Ben Nevis, but its peak is 1,000m beneath the surface.
Prof J Murray Roberts, from Heriot-Watt University, and his colleagues filmed more than 100 species on its slopes.
They published their findings in the open access journal Scientific Reports.
Prof Roberts has now shared the footage from the dive exclusively with the BBC.
He and his team used a remotely operated submersible vehicle to explore and film the aquatic mountain slopes.
"These are vast structures in the ocean," Prof Roberts explained to the BBC.
"They’re exciting because they grow up through the ocean and have steep sloping sides. [When] the currents hit the sides of the seamount and they stir up nutrients, they become really productive areas."
Prof Roberts and his colleagues watched from a ship-based laboratory while their rover explored the depths.
Read more at original post on BBC News

UK’s Deep Sea Mountain Life Filmed

by Victoria Gill, BBC

Scientists have sent a remotely operated vehicle to film one of the UK’s three undersea mountains, known as seamounts.

The Hebrides Terrace Seamount, off the west coast of Scotland, is higher than Ben Nevis, but its peak is 1,000m beneath the surface.

Prof J Murray Roberts, from Heriot-Watt University, and his colleagues filmed more than 100 species on its slopes.

They published their findings in the open access journal Scientific Reports.

Prof Roberts has now shared the footage from the dive exclusively with the BBC.

He and his team used a remotely operated submersible vehicle to explore and film the aquatic mountain slopes.

"These are vast structures in the ocean," Prof Roberts explained to the BBC.

"They’re exciting because they grow up through the ocean and have steep sloping sides. [When] the currents hit the sides of the seamount and they stir up nutrients, they become really productive areas."

Prof Roberts and his colleagues watched from a ship-based laboratory while their rover explored the depths.

Read more at original post on BBC News

rhamphotheca:

First Video of Living and Enormous Deep Sea Crustacean

Well, enormous for an Amphipod…

by Sandrine Ceurstemont

Living in one of the Earth’s deepest ocean trenches, the world’s largest species of amphipod has so far managed to avoid the videos of the paparazzi. But during an expedition to the Kermadec trench off the coast of New Zealand in April, Alan Jamieson from the University of Aberdeen, UK, and his colleagues filmed a living Alicella gigantean for the first time, more than 7 kilometres below the ocean surface.

The video captures a feeding frenzy of deep-sea snailfish, Notoliparis kermadecensis sociable fish that are well-adapted to the extreme pressure, total darkness and cold temperatures at such depths.

Cruising along the left-hand side of the video, the white shrimp-like creature is the newly spotted Alicella gigantea. It is between 20 and 25 centimetres long, 10 times larger than similar amphipods discovered in other deep-sea locations – although Jamieson previously snapped, but did not video, an even bigger one – a 34-centimetre giant…

(read more: New Scientist)

The deep sea is simultaneously and equally creepy and cool. 

(via ichthyologist)