Slow Life of Corals and Sponges by Daniel Stoupin

To make this little clip I took 150000 shots. Why so many? Because macro photography involves shallow depth of field. To extend it, I used focus stacking. Each frame of the video is actually a stack that consists of 3-12 shots where in-focus areas are merged. Just the intro and last scene are regular real-time footage. One frame required about 10 minutes of processing time (raw conversion + stacking).

oliviaaaaaaaaaaab asked:

Hey, I was wondering what college courses you would have to take to become a marine biologist?

I’m guessing you’re from the US - and I think the courses depend on the college. You’ll have to get in touch with the professors or careers department or, if any followers can pitch in here. 

A Brit-schooled Filipino resident is probably not the best person to ask ;) 

Anonymous asked:

Hi! So I live in England and I'm really interested in becoming a marine biologist, specifically working in conservation. I would really love to do some volunteering and gain experience, but unfortunately I live in the midlands (and am in no position to move away) and there is no sea for miles. I don't have a clue how I could go about finding places or organisations to volunteer with in such a remote area. Any advice?

Have a look into the Marine Conservation Society (MCS)  - they many have need of volunteers for campaigns that aren’t necessarily near the sea! If you can’t find anything on the website - write to them! 

Good luck!

allezenenfer asked:

hello! My name is Demy Melgar, I live in New York City. I'm currently in my first year of college, I want to study marine biology, anything and everything related to the ocean is my passion. My college does not have a marine biology program/major. I'm looking for advice, what would you recommend, transferring to a school with a marine bio program or finishing college with my b.s in Biology and then get my masters in marine bio? I'm very unsure about this, I really want to make the best choice

Check out this question on my FAQs

I’m not sure one is better than the other. I was advised both routes. I would approach your professors and any careers department available to you. Write to the schools that offer marine biology and ask the questions you aren’t sure about. Basically, there’s no one-size-fits all answer here. Get informed, consider your position financially and personally, and then take a leap! 

Best of luck! 

Where Sea Turtles Spend Their ‘Lost Years’

ERIK STOKSTAD | Science NOW
Now, researchers have published the first satellite tracking data from young sea turtles, charting a leisurely voyage under the sun. The youngsters idly float north along the Gulf Stream, then head toward the Azores. Along the way, they spend most of their time riding the waves, and the sun helps raise their body temperature. “The data from this handful of turtles could lead to some really important developments” in understanding turtle populations, says Nathan Putman, a turtle biologist at Oregon State University, Corvallis.
The early life of loggerheads and other sea turtles used to be called “the lost years,” because no one knew exactly where they went. But over decades, researchers pieced together the animals’ natural history from ship observations, the pattern of ocean currents, and other data. More recently, other scientists have studied isotopes from turtle tissue to analyze their diet and past locations and created computer simulations of their journey. The basic picture is this: Hatchlings head out to sea to avoid fish, sharks, and other predators. Once off the continental shelf, they eventually end up in a current, called the North Atlantic subtropical g. A few years later, they come back to their birthplaces on the East Coast of the United States.
The transmitters survived between 27 and 220 days, during which some turtles roamed as far as 4300 kilometers, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. As expected, the turtles all headed north with the Gulf Stream, then most turned eastward around Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. The paths were consistent with what Putman’s computer models had predicted. The turtles weren’t single-mindedly heading toward the Azores, but looping around in small eddies and trying to avoid the coldest water. They also spent almost all of their time on the surface, and Mansfield suspects that this is to help stay warm. “It’s kind of a common sense thing,” Mansfield says. (They may also be waiting to develop the lung capacity for diving.)
Read More
Journal Article

Where Sea Turtles Spend Their ‘Lost Years’

ERIK STOKSTAD | Science NOW

Now, researchers have published the first satellite tracking data from young sea turtles, charting a leisurely voyage under the sun. The youngsters idly float north along the Gulf Stream, then head toward the Azores. Along the way, they spend most of their time riding the waves, and the sun helps raise their body temperature. “The data from this handful of turtles could lead to some really important developments” in understanding turtle populations, says Nathan Putman, a turtle biologist at Oregon State University, Corvallis.

The early life of loggerheads and other sea turtles used to be called “the lost years,” because no one knew exactly where they went. But over decades, researchers pieced together the animals’ natural history from ship observations, the pattern of ocean currents, and other data. More recently, other scientists have studied isotopes from turtle tissue to analyze their diet and past locations and created computer simulations of their journey. The basic picture is this: Hatchlings head out to sea to avoid fish, sharks, and other predators. Once off the continental shelf, they eventually end up in a current, called the North Atlantic subtropical g. A few years later, they come back to their birthplaces on the East Coast of the United States.

The transmitters survived between 27 and 220 days, during which some turtles roamed as far as 4300 kilometers, the team reports today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. As expected, the turtles all headed north with the Gulf Stream, then most turned eastward around Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. The paths were consistent with what Putman’s computer models had predicted. The turtles weren’t single-mindedly heading toward the Azores, but looping around in small eddies and trying to avoid the coldest water. They also spent almost all of their time on the surface, and Mansfield suspects that this is to help stay warm. “It’s kind of a common sense thing,” Mansfield says. (They may also be waiting to develop the lung capacity for diving.)

Read More

Journal Article