mad-as-a-marine-biologist
Mum: When I was a kid, I remember that my Dad slaughtered one…it was a beautiful turtle
Me: Did you eat it?
Mum: Yes.
Me: Was it yummy?
Mum: OF COURSE! But I still remember because I felt so sorry for the turtle!
Mum, on the subject of endangered Sea Turtles. (via mad-as-a-marine-biologist)

tippingtripod asked:

I was born in a beach community in the Philippines. My mom told me sea turtles used to lay eggs on that beach, but the villagers would consume entire nests that they found. By the time I came around, in the 80s, sea turtles had completely vanished from the area. Because of mom's story, I've always had a soft spot for those guys. Glad I found your blog!

It’s such a long standing tradition, and in ye olden days it would have been a really important source of protein, but there’s just no excuse anymore! Sea turtles are so sensitive, if they don’t feel comfortable on a nesting beach (i.e. disturbed during nest digging) they won’t come back! 

My mum is from the Philippines too…she told me a story of when she ate a turtle. I’ll post it next.

Thanks for sharing :)

Bicephalic Green Turtle Hatchlings by Karen Chen
Bicephalic or tricephalic animals are the only type of multi-headed creatures seen in the real work and form by the same process as conjoined twins: resulting from the failed seperation of monozygotic twins.
These guys never even made it out the egg. They are at Stage 3 of development. I’ll try and get to explaining the stages later. We found them when we did a nest excavation and opened the unhatched eggs to note the stage of development. This can tell you a lot about your hatchery location/shade etc. 

Bicephalic Green Turtle Hatchlings by Karen Chen

Bicephalic or tricephalic animals are the only type of multi-headed creatures seen in the real work and form by the same process as conjoined twins: resulting from the failed seperation of monozygotic twins.

These guys never even made it out the egg. They are at Stage 3 of development. I’ll try and get to explaining the stages later. We found them when we did a nest excavation and opened the unhatched eggs to note the stage of development. This can tell you a lot about your hatchery location/shade etc. 


mad-as-a-marine-biologist
mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

A Hawksbill Turtle hatchling in Tioman, 2OO9. Although all species of sea turtle are endangered, this species is critically endangered. This was photo was taken at the Melina Beach Turtle Hatchery which has since started concentrating on education. Hatchery work on the island is being continued by the Juara Turtle Project, and TAT Turtle Sanctuary.

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

A Hawksbill Turtle hatchling in Tioman, 2OO9. Although all species of sea turtle are endangered, this species is critically endangered. This was photo was taken at the Melina Beach Turtle Hatchery which has since started concentrating on education. Hatchery work on the island is being continued by the Juara Turtle Project, and TAT Turtle Sanctuary.

mad-as-a-marine-biologist
mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Photo by Karen Chen
Keeping a respectful distance from a huge mamma Green Turtle after a whole nights efforts. She lay two decoy nests before finally settling down to business. We could hear her panting from the effort, and the force with which she was digging the sand was painful.
If you ever get a chance to witness this, here’s a few pointers:
Be patient, she’s gonna be there a long time. Bring a jumper, it’s likely to be in the middle of the night. That’s cold no matter where you are.
Keep a safe distance, that sand is painful, plus if you disturb her, she won’t come back to the same beach to nest next time. Think of it as bad bedside manner in a hospital. And she always comes back to the same beach from which she was born, so don’t mess with that. 
Don’t use any torches. That’ll disorientate her. She’s relying on the moon or lack of it. Plus they don’t got good eyes anyway.
Silence. Observe it. 
Under no circumstances ‘ride’ her on her way back to the sea, as they did in Terengganu, Malaysia, which, coincidentally, no longer has Sea Turtles nesting on it’s beaches.   

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Photo by Karen Chen

Keeping a respectful distance from a huge mamma Green Turtle after a whole nights efforts. She lay two decoy nests before finally settling down to business. We could hear her panting from the effort, and the force with which she was digging the sand was painful.

If you ever get a chance to witness this, here’s a few pointers:

  • Be patient, she’s gonna be there a long time. Bring a jumper, it’s likely to be in the middle of the night. That’s cold no matter where you are.
  • Keep a safe distance, that sand is painful, plus if you disturb her, she won’t come back to the same beach to nest next time. Think of it as bad bedside manner in a hospital. And she always comes back to the same beach from which she was born, so don’t mess with that.
  • Don’t use any torches. That’ll disorientate her. She’s relying on the moon or lack of it. Plus they don’t got good eyes anyway.
  • Silence. Observe it.
  • Under no circumstances ‘ride’ her on her way back to the sea, as they did in Terengganu, Malaysia, which, coincidentally, no longer has Sea Turtles nesting on it’s beaches.