Dear Cathay Pacific,
 I applaud you for your decision to ban the transport of shark fin products on your carriers and subsidiary airline Dragon Air.
Anti-shark fin campaigners estimated that you flew 50% of the air cargo trade into Hong Kong each year, equating up to 650 tonnes of shark fins. You claimed it was less than this, but no matter how much it was, you’ve stopped. Thank you.
Whether it’s because of the petition that was signed in July, or your years of research into the matter, you’ve stopped. Thank you.
Your decision means that you’ve restricted the availability of shark fin products in Hong Kong and mainland China. It means you are part of many companies that are helping to turn the tide against the unsustainable shark fin industry. Once again, thank you.  
Yours sincerely,
Everyone (because saving sharks is saving ourselves).  

Dear Cathay Pacific,

 I applaud you for your decision to ban the transport of shark fin products on your carriers and subsidiary airline Dragon Air.

Anti-shark fin campaigners estimated that you flew 50% of the air cargo trade into Hong Kong each year, equating up to 650 tonnes of shark fins. You claimed it was less than this, but no matter how much it was, you’ve stopped. Thank you.

Whether it’s because of the petition that was signed in July, or your years of research into the matter, you’ve stopped. Thank you.

Your decision means that you’ve restricted the availability of shark fin products in Hong Kong and mainland China. It means you are part of many companies that are helping to turn the tide against the unsustainable shark fin industry. Once again, thank you.  

Yours sincerely,

Everyone (because saving sharks is saving ourselves).  

asiasociety

China’s Shark Fin Soup Ban Draws Contrasting Reactions on Weibo, Twitter

asiasociety:

Users of Chinese and Western social media speak out on an announced ban on consumption of shark fin soup at Chinese government banquets.

Read full story here

[Quote from story]… Reactions on China’s microblogs have been far more vocal — amassing some tens of thousands of posts in one day, most of them very cynical.

Shark fin is only one dish in the range of exotic delicacies in China. There are still  bear paws, armadillos, birds’ nests, and monkey brains," posted 老缅翡翠.

Lavish government spending on delicacies was also a great concern. 此时此刻Sun: “When they eat such delicacies as bird nests, they are eating from the blood and sweat of the people!

Still, others were confused why it would take three years to implement the policy. 吕N帆微博达人posted: “Why the heck would it take three years? Are you trying to eat the sharks into extinction before then?

Some bloggers thought the policy won’t be enforceable, since there is so little oversight on government officials, especially on what they eat. 口香榶: “Whether they eat it or not, nobody can tell! What a farce.

Still, others pretended the announcement actually was a farce — as Curious_蒋 wrote, “Okay we’ll stop eating shark fins. Just use them to rinse and gargle.”

Glad to see these reactions coming out of China’s microblogging site, Weibo. Not because they’re cynical, because that all might be true, but because people are actually talking about shark fin, and having opinions on it, and not just accepting it as cultural tradition. For me at least, it’s a rare, albeit very limited (and media selected) insight into what today’s Chinese citizen thinks about the issue. 

Shark fin soup will likely be banned from official banquets in about three years, according to the Government Offices Administration of the State Council, reported the China Network Television yesterday.

The administration said the ban on shark fins at State functions is likely to take three years to implement but could be done in one or two years if proper conditions prevail.

The administration was responding to a proposal by 30 National People’s Congress deputies who called for shark fin to be taken off the menu at official banquets during this year’s “two sessions.” 

NPC delegate, Ding Liguo, also proposed at last year’s meeting that the country should outlaw the trading of shark fin in an effort to maintain the ecological balance of the world’s oceans.

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) on the other hand has ruled that publically funded official banquets “must not include exorbitant food materials and endangered species such as shark fin,” Tsang Tak-sing, secretary for Home Affairs of Hong Kong, said in May last year.

MAAMB: This might be just one step, but it’s a big one for the Chinese government. This might take three years to come into play, but it’s a move that will drastically raise awareness and set precedent for the whole country. And that’s pretty damn cool. 

oceandevotion

oceandevotion:

Shark populations around the globe are plummeting at an alarming rate, threatening the stability of our ocean ecosystem mainly for shark fin. Vancouver is the second largest Chinese restaurant industry in North America next to San Francisco. Today, you can help make a difference by…

Sign here to petition Vancouver to ban Shark Fin products. As the 2nd largest Chinese restaurant industry in N. America, you could make a real difference.

In a move that has made the country a new leader in shark protection, Chile yesterday banned the practice of shark finning from its national waters. After months of discussions since the bill on the ban was drafted and presented by the conservation group Oceana to the Chilean National Congress in January, the vote to approve the bill passed unanimously.

The ban effects 30 shark species that cruise the Chilean coastline, which covers an extensive stretch of the eastern Pacific all the way to the Southern Ocean. Of those sharks, 15 are specific targets for finning, including the near threatened Blue sharks (Prionace glauca) and the vulnerable Shortfin Mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus).

sexyactionplanet

sexyactionplanet:

Episode 1: A Fin Tale

A look into the cruel and unsustainable shark fin industry.

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A big thank you must go to mad-as-a-marine-biologist for the reef and thresher shark footage and wheretherebefins for the Singapore city footage.

I know I blogged the video a few days ago but this is from my friend Tara’s new blog! She writes about conservation and is going to make ‘episodes’ of conservation issues. One to watch.