High-res Actually, I want a fin-free world. But let’s start with Chinese New Year. Baby steps after all. 
Having grown up in Singapore, I have seen and felt the magic of Chinese New Year. It’s so red, so much food… so much fun! I lived there long enough to remember when fireworks were allowed, and how quiet it was when they were banned. I remember getting ang paos from my Mum’s friends, thinking that it was cheating because I wasn’t Chinese. Best of all, in those days, it also meant half-term break. 
I don’t get ang paos these days, or half-term breaks but CNY is better. Every year it’s better. Every year less and less people are willing to consume and/or serve Shark’s Fin Soup. And it’s taken years to get here. 
More and more of the younger generations are educated and aware of the issues surrounding this tradition, and are taking a stand. It may seem trivial to you, to make this your profile picture on whatever social media, but it shows support. It shows that the people breaking tradition, and going against their families on this issue have global support. 
A Singaporean friend of mine managed to wean her entire family off eating it, another friend refused to be a bridesmaid or even attend her best friend’s wedding if she served the soup. She also asked people not to give her presents for her birthday but to pledge to stop eating shark’s fin soup. 
Support them, support sharks, and Happy Year of the Snake! 

Actually, I want a fin-free world. But let’s start with Chinese New Year. Baby steps after all. 

Having grown up in Singapore, I have seen and felt the magic of Chinese New Year. It’s so red, so much food… so much fun! I lived there long enough to remember when fireworks were allowed, and how quiet it was when they were banned. I remember getting ang paos from my Mum’s friends, thinking that it was cheating because I wasn’t Chinese. Best of all, in those days, it also meant half-term break. 

I don’t get ang paos these days, or half-term breaks but CNY is better. Every year it’s better. Every year less and less people are willing to consume and/or serve Shark’s Fin Soup. And it’s taken years to get here. 

More and more of the younger generations are educated and aware of the issues surrounding this tradition, and are taking a stand. It may seem trivial to you, to make this your profile picture on whatever social media, but it shows support. It shows that the people breaking tradition, and going against their families on this issue have global support. 

A Singaporean friend of mine managed to wean her entire family off eating it, another friend refused to be a bridesmaid or even attend her best friend’s wedding if she served the soup. She also asked people not to give her presents for her birthday but to pledge to stop eating shark’s fin soup. 

Support them, support sharks, and Happy Year of the Snake! 

oceanaware:

Help stop the shark fin trade.

Reducing demand for shark fin soup is the most important thing we can do to protect sharks from being driven to extinction. This demand has created the unsustainable, virtually unrestrained killing of sharks. Tens of millions of sharks a year are killed for the shark fin trade.

A survey conducted by our PR agency Grayling in Singapore confirmed findings of a 2011 Bloom study in Hong Kong indicating a significant number of people in Chinese communities are aware of the problems associated with shark fin soup. They want to stop or curtail their consumption. But our study also found that despite their willingness to stop eating shark’s fin soup, they continue to eat and even serve it because of the strong social pressure to do so. More cultural reinforcement is necessary to show that now is the time to act on your convictions and reject shark fin soup.

Sign the petition, spread the word. Shark finning needs to END.

(via voiceoftheocean)

you wish jelly fish: Help fight the war against Shark Finning

oceandevotion:

Shark populations around the globe are plummeting at an alarming rate, threatening the stability of our ocean ecosystem mainly for shark fin. Vancouver is the second largest Chinese restaurant industry in North America next to San Francisco. Today, you can help make a difference by…

Sign here to petition Vancouver to ban Shark Fin products. As the 2nd largest Chinese restaurant industry in N. America, you could make a real difference.

WHERE THERE BE FINS: DISGUSTING SHARK FINNING

wheretherebefins:

Shark being butchered while still alive

Photo source: http://www.stop-finning.com/

What is shark fin soup?

You don’t need to spend long in South-east Asia before you hear about a product called shark fin soup. This is a soup that is made as a sign of wealth, a food of past royalty,…

(via wheretherebefins-deactivated201)

Shark Fins Traced to Home Waters Using DNA—A First

thetoucantimes:

shark finning picture

Workers remove the fin from a female mako shark on a beach in Santa Rosalia, Mexico, in an undated picture.

Many of the hammerhead sharks that are butchered to feed Asian demand for shark-fin soup start their lives in American waters, a new forensic study shows.

For the first time, scientists have used DNA from shark fins to determine where they came from. The researchers traced finds from the scalloped hammerhead shark species—collected at the world’s biggest fin market in Hong Kong—back to rare populations in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific oceans.

The trade in shark fins supplies Asian markets with the key ingredient in the luxury dish shark-fin soup. The practice claims up to 73 million sharks annually, including up to 3 million hammerheads. The finless fish are usually tossed back into the ocean to die.

Because the vast flow of shark fins to global markets usually operates in secret, conservationists have been left in the dark about where the sharks are killed. And governments can’t control the trade if they don’t know how many sharks are being taken from their waters.

The shark-fin market is “like this big Wild West show [that] no one is monitoring,” said study leader Demian Chapman, now at the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at New York State’s Stony Brook University.

But the new DNA technique, which Chapman worked on at Nova Southeastern University, may be a tool for controlling the shark trade, he said.

Read more

 Another awesome way that science is being applied to conservation. The more we know, the more we can do about it!