The Coral Song - by AJ Jenkins

Ladies and Gentlemen, I present to you the new soundtrack to my life. My work with the conservation project Green Fins is all about getting divers to help protect the reef, and reaching out to local communities to do the same. Whilst most divers and dive guides are fairly knowledgeable about the reef, I’ve met plenty of people, tourists and locals alike, who don’t know that coral is alive. 

This is the soundtrack for all my future presentations. And the song that will be in my head for the rest of the week. And I don’t even mind. 

Go ahead. Enjoy. Sing. Share. 

Stealing the future to sell it in the present, and then calling what we make GDP

Prince Charles quoting Paul Hawken (Environmentalist Author) to make his point about “Accounting for Sustainability”. We need a new way to measure economic prosperity, that isn’t just about the money. 

Businesses have a responsibility too. 

Prince Charles, your work to promote environmental issues makes me want to stand up and sing the national anthem. Unfortunately I only know the first four words. 

Also, can you start making audiobooks?

thegreenurbanist
thegreenurbanist:

motherjones:

greenpeacesemester:

Great article on Mother Jones about “The Origins of Anti-Litter Campaigns”
According to Heather Rogers’ Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life of Garbage, the entire anti-litter movement was initiated by a consortium of industry groups who wanted to divert the nation’s attention away from even more radical legislation to control the amount of waste these companies were putting out. It’s a good story worth retelling.

Oldie but a goodie.

“Cradle to Cradle”

thegreenurbanist:

motherjones:

greenpeacesemester:

Great article on Mother Jones about “The Origins of Anti-Litter Campaigns”

According to Heather Rogers’ Gone Tomorrow: The Hidden Life of Garbage, the entire anti-litter movement was initiated by a consortium of industry groups who wanted to divert the nation’s attention away from even more radical legislation to control the amount of waste these companies were putting out. It’s a good story worth retelling.

Oldie but a goodie.

Cradle to Cradle

Trashed 

No Place For Waste with the participation of Jeremy Irons, looks at the risks to the food chain and the environment through pollution of our air, land and sea by waste. The film reveals surprising truths about very immediate and potent dangers to our health. It is a global conversation from Iceland to Indonesia between the film star Jeremy Irons and scientists, politicians and ordinary individuals whose health and livelihoods have been fundamentally affected by waste pollution. Visually and emotionally the film is both horrific and beautiful: an interplay of human interest and political wake-up call. But it ends on a message of hope: showing how the risks to our survival can easily be averted through sustainable approaches that provide far more employment than the current ‘waste industry’.

ponderinthought
ponderinthought:

Breakfast of Champions?
As part of his series on albatros chicks taken in the isolated Pacific Ocean Islands of Midway, Chris Jordan shows us that on a diet of human trash, tens of thousands of these chicks die on Midway every year from starvation, toxicity and choking.
When one finds bottle caps, plastic bags, toothbrushes and syringes in the stomachs of baby birds on one of the most remote islands on Earth, does it not begin to raise serious questions about the harm we (the human species) are doing to this Earth?

A lot of the debris that Albatross’ feed their chicks comes from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. I think more worrying than finding this much rubbish on remote islands (and that is worrying) is the fact that there is plastic trapped in the middle of the ocean. So much of it. The density of plastic bits in the patch outnumbers zooplankton SEVEN TIMES. 

ponderinthought:

Breakfast of Champions?

As part of his series on albatros chicks taken in the isolated Pacific Ocean Islands of Midway, Chris Jordan shows us that on a diet of human trash, tens of thousands of these chicks die on Midway every year from starvation, toxicity and choking.

When one finds bottle caps, plastic bags, toothbrushes and syringes in the stomachs of baby birds on one of the most remote islands on Earth, does it not begin to raise serious questions about the harm we (the human species) are doing to this Earth?

A lot of the debris that Albatross’ feed their chicks comes from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. I think more worrying than finding this much rubbish on remote islands (and that is worrying) is the fact that there is plastic trapped in the middle of the ocean. So much of it. The density of plastic bits in the patch outnumbers zooplankton SEVEN TIMES. 

oceandevotion

oceandevotion:

Shark populations around the globe are plummeting at an alarming rate, threatening the stability of our ocean ecosystem mainly for shark fin. Vancouver is the second largest Chinese restaurant industry in North America next to San Francisco. Today, you can help make a difference by…

Sign here to petition Vancouver to ban Shark Fin products. As the 2nd largest Chinese restaurant industry in N. America, you could make a real difference.

earthhour

earthhour:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Dear Tumblr,

We are writing to ask you to consider adding a ‘Conservation’ or ‘Environment’ featured tag.

Earth Hour Global has always valued Tumblr as a platform to share not only our own stories, but also all of the conservation stories, images and videos from around the world that inspire us to come to work everyday.

As we’re just one month out from Earth Hour, we have been able to increase the proportion of original content on our blog to around 90%. However we began this blog back in May of 2011, when Earth Hour is traditionally considered far from people’s minds.

We relied heavily Tumblr as a platform to discover and share stories with our own community that were relevant to our message of positive action and uniting people to protect the planet. It’s become one of the main tools for us to continue an inspiring conversation around sustainability, environment and climate change, beyond the hour. 

The featured tag for Conservation would be a welcome addition to Tumblr. We have put a lot of effort into our own blog because we see the incredible ways that this platform allows organisations and individuals to share content around what we consider the most important issue of our time.  

We’ve also seen the growth in followers and visitors to our Tumblr, and now consider it one of our key digital assets. I’m sure the other organisations and individuals who put so much time into their Tumblr blogs would have an even better experience here if the Conservation tag became featured. 

Earth Hour says it more eloquently.