halfman-halfocean
saveroman:


An unidentified species of coelacanth in South Africa’s Sodwana Bay.

One of the world’s oldest types of fish, coelacanths are primitive, slow-moving fish that had been thought extinct until an individual was found off Africa in 1938. There are now over 40 known coelacanth species. The two that live today are called living fossils because they have remained virtually unchanged for 320 million years.
[source]

saveroman:

An unidentified species of coelacanth in South Africa’s Sodwana Bay.

One of the world’s oldest types of fish, coelacanths are primitive, slow-moving fish that had been thought extinct until an individual was found off Africa in 1938. There are now over 40 known coelacanth species. The two that live today are called living fossils because they have remained virtually unchanged for 320 million years.

wwf

wwf:

Ignorance is no longer an excuse for wildlife criminals, with awareness signboards on wildlife crime penalties built around Gerik town, near Malaysia’s Belum-Temengor Forest Complex.

These…

 Belum-Temengor is though to be the oldest forest in the world, even older than the Amazon and the Congo. It is one of the most serene places I’ve ever visited, and it’s exciting to see some progress!

wwf
wwf:

New photos of the Taiwanese shark fin trade from the Pew Charitable Trusts are heartbreaking.

Image: Hammerhead sharks are targeted, and greatly valued for their fins. A 2009 study in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean found that hammerheads have had a 70% decline in abundance since 1981.
Photo Credit: Shawn Heinrichs for the Pew Environment Group


 Words, I have none.

wwf:

New photos of the Taiwanese shark fin trade from the Pew Charitable Trusts are heartbreaking.

Image: Hammerhead sharks are targeted, and greatly valued for their fins. A 2009 study in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean found that hammerheads have had a 70% decline in abundance since 1981.

Photo Credit: Shawn Heinrichs for the Pew Environment Group

 Words, I have none.

take-nothing-but-photos
take-nothing-but-photos:

WWF is supporting a new project to track narwhals, Arctic whales best known for the long tusk that projects forward from their faces. The project partners fitted the little-researched whales with satellite tracking devices. WWF is also launching a web page to showcase the partners’ fieldwork and research, with maps and information about the latest movements of the narwhals as they move around Baffin Bay in Canada’s Nunavut territory.Pete Ewins, Arctic species specialist for WWF-Canada, said that it is expected the project will contribute fascinating information about the habits of narwhals.“We’re supporting this project because it is a chance to better understand these animals while their world changes around them. We know Narwhals are often associated with sea ice, and we know the sea ice is shrinking. WWF is trying to understand how narwhals, as well as all other ice associated animals in the arctic can adapt to a changing environment. We can put this knowledge together with existing Inuit knowledge, and we can work with Inuit and other stakeholders to help the animals survive the coming changes.”

take-nothing-but-photos:

WWF is supporting a new project to track narwhals, Arctic whales best known for the long tusk that projects forward from their faces. 

The project partners fitted the little-researched whales with satellite tracking devices. WWF is also launching a web page to showcase the partners’ fieldwork and research, with maps and information about the latest movements of the narwhals as they move around Baffin Bay in Canada’s Nunavut territory.

Pete Ewins, Arctic species specialist for WWF-Canada, said that it is expected the project will contribute fascinating information about the habits of narwhals.

“We’re supporting this project because it is a chance to better understand these animals while their world changes around them. We know Narwhals are often associated with sea ice, and we know the sea ice is shrinking. WWF is trying to understand how narwhals, as well as all other ice associated animals in the arctic can adapt to a changing environment. We can put this knowledge together with existing Inuit knowledge, and we can work with Inuit and other stakeholders to help the animals survive the coming changes.”